Guide to my GitHub Scripts

This article, which will be updated as new scripts are added, serves as an index to the scripts I have uploaded to GitHub with a quick summary of what the script can do and links to explanatory blog articles. The scripts are split logically into a number of GitHub repositories, namely:

Citrix

  1. DailyChecks.ps1 – allows you to get a summary of your Citrix XenApp/XenDesktop 7.x deployment emailed to you via a scheduled task to help spot issues. Blog Post
  2. End Disconnected sessions.ps1 – finds sessions disconnected over a given duration and logs them off, optionally terminating specified processes in case they are preventing logoff.
  3. Get PVS boot time stats.ps1 – pull PVS target device boot times from PVS server event logs to show fastest, slowest, mean, median and mode values with the option to send an email if thresholds are breached. Blog Post
  4. Get PVS device info.ps1 – retrieve PVS target device information from PVS servers and display their configuration along with corresponding data from Citrix Studio, Active Directory, VMware and the devices themselves such as last boot time & IP address. Selected devices can then have operations performed on them such as deleting from PVS/AD/Studio or rebooting. Blog Post
  5. Ghost Hunter.ps1 – find disconnected Citrix XenApp sessions which Studio/Director say still exist but do not and mark them such that they cannot prevent affected users from launching further published applications. Blog Post
  6. Show PVS audit trail.ps1 – collect PVS auditing events in a given date/time range and show on-screen or export to a csv file. Can also enable auditing if it is not already enabled.
  7. Show Studio Access.ps1 – show all users granted access to Citrix Studio and their access levels and optionally export to a csv file. It will recursively enumerate AD groups to show each individual user with Studio access.
  8. StoreFront Log Levels.ps1 – display and/or change the logging levels on Citrix StoreFront servers. It can operate on multiple servers from a single script invocation. Blog Post
  9. Parse storefront log files.ps1 – show Citrix StoreFront log files in a sortable and filterable consolidated view, optionally filtering on entry type and date ranges. Selected lines will be placed in the clipboard to enable further research. Blog Post
  10. Get Citrix admin logs.ps1 – retrieve the logs viewable in Studio in a given time window and write to a csv file or display in an on screen sortable/filterable grid view. The logs can be filtered on the user who performed the action, where the action was performed from, either Studio or Director, whether it was an admin or config change action and the type of action such as logoff or shadow.
  11. Get Citrix OData.ps1 – query the OData interface exposed by Citrix Delivery Controllers to retrieve information on sessions, errors, machines, etc. This is where Citrix Director gets its information from and also means that you don’t have to query SQL (which is unsupported). See here for information on what is available.
  12. Modify and launch file.ps1 – make modifications to a text file such as an ICA file, e.g. to change window sizes, and launch the newly created file. Can also install itself as an explorer SendTo context menu shortcut.
  13. Recreate PVS XML manifest.ps1 – create the XML manifest that PVS needs in order to import disks which have multiple versions. Can import from orphaned SQL data or examination of specified *.(a)vhd(x) files. Use when a disk has disappeared from the PVS console.
  14. Direct2Events.ps1 – Uses OData (like Citrix Director) to retrieve Citrix Virtual Apps and Desktops Session information from a Delivery Controller and displays in a WPF GUI allowing troubleshooting and remediation without needing to go to different tools such as PVS Console, VMware vSphere and Active Directory or connecting to the end-points

Microsoft

  1. Change CPU priorities.ps1 – dynamically change the base priorities of processes which over consume CPU so other processes get preferential access to the CPU. If a process stops over consuming then its original base priority will be restored. Can include/exclude specific users, processes and sessions.
  2. Trimmer.ps1 – trim the working sets of processes to make more memory available for other processes/users on a system. Can trim on demand or when processes are unlikely to need the memory such as when a session is idle, disconnected or locked. Can also set hard working set limits to cap leaky processes. Blog Post Blog Post Blog Post
  3. Get installed software.ps1 – show the installed software on one or more computers where the computers are specified on the command line or via a csv file. Queries the registry rather than the win32_product WMI/CIM class which is faster and gives more complete results. Output can be to a csv file, an on screen grid view or standard output for piping into something else. If -uninstall is specified, items selected when OK is clicked in the grid view will be uninstalled. Similarly, a -remove option takes a comma separated list of package names or regular expressions and will run the uninstaller for them, silently if -silent is specified and the uninstall program is msiexec.exe.
  4. Group Membership Modifier.ps1 – add or remove a specified list of user accounts from local groups, such as Administrators or Remote Desktop Users, on one or more machines.
  5. Clone VHD.ps1 – create a new Hyper-V virtual machine from a .vhd/.vhdx file containing an existing VM, selecting the VM configuration in a GUI. Will integrate itself into Windows Explorer so you right-click on a virtual disk file and run it, elevating itself if required. Can make linked clones which can reduce disk space. Blog Post
  6. Fix Sysprep Appx errors.ps1 – parses sysprep logs looking for failures due to AppX packages causing sysprep to fail, removes them and runs sysprep again until successful.
  7. Show NTFS zone info.ps1 – Google Chrome and Internet Explorer store the URL of where downloaded files have come from in an NTFS Alternate Data Stream (ADS). This script shows these and optionally removes this information. Blog Post
  8. Profile Cleaner.ps1 – retrieve local profile information from one or more machines, queried from Active Directory OU, group or name, present them in an on-screen filterable/sortable grid view and delete any selected after prompting for confirmation. Options to include or exclude specific users and write the results to a csv file. Blog Post
  9. Show users.ps1 – Show current and historic logins including profile information, in a given time range or since boot, across a number of machines queried from Active Directory OU, group or name, write to csv file or display in an on-screen sortable/filterable grid view and logoff any selected sessions after confirmation. Works on RDS and infrastructure servers as well as XenApp. Blog Post
  10. Profile.ps1 – a PowerShell profile intended to be used on Server Core machines, with PowerShell set as the shell, which reports key configuration and status information during logon.
  11. Add firewall rules for dynamic SQL ports.ps1 – find all SQL instances and create firewall rules for them to work with dynamic ports
  12. Find Outlook drafts.ps1 – find emails in your Outlook drafts folder of a given age, prompt with the information with the option to open the draft. Designed to help you stop forgetting to complete and send emails. Has options to install & uninstall itself to launch at logon. Blog Post
  13. Outlook Leecher.ps1 – find SMTP email addresses in all your Outlook folders including calendars and write them to a csv file including context such as the subject and date of the email.
  14. Check Outlook recipient domains – an Outlook macro/function which will check the recipient addresses when sending an email and will warn if the email is going to more than a single external domain. Designed to help prevent accidental information leakage where someone may pick the wrong person when composing.
  15. Fix reminders – an Outlook macro/function which will find any non-all day Outlook meetings which have no reminder set, display the details in a popup and add a reminder for a number of minutes before the event as selected by the user. Blog Post.
  16. Check Skype Signed in.ps1 – uses the Lync 2013 SDK to check Skype for Business is signed in and will alert if it is not via a popup and playing an optional audio file. Can also pop up an alert if the client has been in “Do Not Disturb” in excess of a given period of time.
  17. Redirect Folders.ps1 – show existing folder redirections for the user running the script or set one or more folder redirections with a comma separated list of items of the form specialfolder=path. For example Music=H:\Music
  18. Check and start processes.ps1 – check periodically if each of a given list of processes is running and if not optionally start it, after an optional prompt is displayed. Any necessary parameters for each process can be specified after an optional semicolon character in the process name argument. Can install or uninstall itself to the per user or per machine registry run key so it runs at logon. Use it to launch and monitor key processes such as Outlook or Skype for Business (lync.exe).
  19. Autorun.ps1 – list, remove or add logon autoruns entries in the file system or registry for the user running the script or all users if the user has permissions. Can also operate on the RunOnce key and wow6432node on x64 systems. Uses regular expressions for matching the shortcut/registry value name and/or the command so knowing the exact names or commands is not required. Uses PowerShell’s built in confirmation mechanism before overwriting/deleting anything.
  20. Find and check IIS server certs.ps1– find IIS servers via OUs or AD groups or specify via regular expression, specific servers or from the contents of a text file. Check the expiry date of any certificates in use and present a list of those expiring within a specified number of days in a grid view, write to csv file or send via email.
  21. wcrasher.cs.ps1 – compiles embedded C# code to produce an exe file (32 or 64 bit or even Itanium) which will crash when the “OK” button of the displayed dialogue box is clicked. Use it to check that the OS is configured the desired way for handling application crashes or to produce dumps for practicing analysis.
  22. WTSApi.ps1 – provides the function Get-WTSSessionInformation which is a wrapper for the WTSQuerySessionInformationW function from wtsapi32.dll with the WTSSessionInfoEx class parameter. This returns an array of session information items for the one or more computers passed to it which can be used in place of running quser.exe (“query user”) and having to parse its somewhat inconsistent output.
  23. Trim run history.ps1 – Remove items from the history of Explorer’s Start->Run menu, and task Manager’s  File->Run new task, either by specifying what to keep or what to remove via regular expression (which can be as simple as something like ‘mstsc’). Uses PowerShell’s builtin confirmation mechansim so by default will prompt before each deletion.
  24. Get Process Durations.ps1 – Retrieve process creation and termination events from the security event log, if auditing of these is enabled, and show the start and end times of the processes and command lines if that auditing is enabled too. Can optionally show how long after logon and/or boot processes started and can filter on specific processes and/or users. Output to csv format file, sortable/filterable grid view or the PowerShell pipeline.
  25. Analyse IIS log files.ps1 – Analyse IIS log files to show requests/min/sec, and min, max, average and median response times per time interval, usually seconds to aid in finding busy/overloaded periods for capacity planning, troubleshooting, etc.
  26. Check AD account expiry.ps1 – Find AD accounts with passwords or accounts expiring within the specified number of days or are locked out or disabled and optionally send an email containing the information. To help spot problems where account expiry could cause issues such as when used as service accounts.
  27. Check SQL account expiry.ps1 – Find SQL accounts with passwords expiring within the specified number of days and optionally send an email containing the information. Useful where these accounts are used as service accounts. Can also be used to send an email alert if the specified SQL server cannot be connected to.
  28. Download and Install Office 365 via ODT.ps1 – Download the latest version of the Office Deployment Kit and use that, once the executable has been extracted and its certificate checked, to download and install Office 365.
  29. Find loaded modules.ps1 – Examine loaded modules all or specific processes by name or pid and show those where the module name/path or company name match a specified string/regex. Designed to help spot processes hooked by 3rd party software like Citrix, Ivanti, Lakeside, etc. Shows module versions so can also be used to play spot the difference between processes.
  30. Get Remote User Logon Times.ps1 – Use WMI to query computers to find out, since boot, when any remote desktop connections logged on. Gives finer granularity than “query user” (quser) and works on multiple computers in a single invocation.
  31. Kill elevated processes.ps1 – Check already running processes and then watch for process created events and if the process is in a specified list and have been launched elevated then terminate them and audit to the event log.
  32. Monitor process start stop.ps1 – Uses WMI/CIM to register for notifications when processes are started or stopped so effectively a process watcher.
  33. Network Profile Actioner.ps1 – Check network connection profiles and if any are connected on a public network, or nothing is connected so the computer is offline, set a registry value differently compared with private/domain network. Defaults to setting the registry such that the username is not displayed on the lock screen if the computer is on a public network or offline to aid with privacy protection.
  34. Power Watcher.ps1 – Designed to help set the most suitable power scheme when using an external power bank for a laptop as the laptop sees it as still being powered by an external power source so does not implement any power saving (on a Dell laptop).
  35. Show FSlogix volumes.ps1 – Show FSLogix currently mounted volume details & cross reference to FSLogix session information in the registry.
  36. Check and fix domain membership.ps1 – Check domain membership of the machine the script is running on and try to repair using Test-ComputerSecureChannel. Can be placed in a computer startup script with encrypted password.
  37. Convert graphics files.ps1 – bulk convert graphics files from one format to another
  38. Get file bitness.ps1 – show the file bitness of specified files or files in a folder including the .NET CPU specifications
  39. event aggregator.ps1 – retrieve all events from the 300+ event logs on one or more computers and show in sortable/filterable gridview and/or write to csv. Various filter in/out option available.
  40. Set Foreground Window.ps1 – find the main window for given one or more processes, by id or name, and optional argument matching, and set as the foreground window or perform another operation on them such as minimising or maximising. Written to solve a problem when a running process refused to show its window or even a taskbar icon for it.
  41. Get MSI Properties.ps1 – get any MSI property, such as ProductVersion, from one or more MSI files by reading the contents of the MSI file. Useful for finding out the version of an MSI file. ALso gets summary information such as bitness https://twitter.com/guyrleech/status/1207013011417948160
  42. Get files modified since boot.ps1 – Find files modified or created since the last boot time without following symbolic links and junction points. Useful to find out what has consumed the Citrix Provisioning Services write cache but can also take arbitrary start and end times to find files modified/created in a given time window for troubleshooting.
  43. Pause Resume Processes.ps1 – Pause or resume processes using debugger API functions. Useful to stop applications being used outside of approved hours, stop resource guzzling applications impacting other processes so it can be examined later. Note that the process resuming a process must be the same one that paused it otherwise it will fail. Also if the pausing process exits, the paused processes will exit. The script caters for this. https://twitter.com/guyrleech/status/1254432210872078337
  44. Bincoder GUI.ps1 – base 64 encode and decode data to and from any file to allow the data to be copied over the Windows clipboard, e.g. to or from a remote session where file sharing sites, email, etc are not available.
  45. Get Extended File Properties.ps1 – Retrieve specified or all extended properties from a file, not just those in the version resource of the file
  46. Add computers to perfmon xml.ps1 – Take an XML template exported from perfmon with a single machine and duplicate all counters for a specified set of machines. This creates a new XML file which can be imported back in to perfmon to capture performance data across all the machines.
  47. Delete profile for group member.ps1 – Delete local user profiles for members of an Active Directory group which are not currently in use
  48. Fix shortcuts.ps1 – Find shortcuts with target or icon path or arguments matching a given regular expression and change to a new string.
  49. Get Account Lockout details.ps1 – Find all domain controllers and show account lockouts in a given time range and/or for a specific user including the machine where the lockout occurred.
  50. Get info via CIM.ps1 – Gather info from one or more computers via CIM and write to CSV files to aid health checking. A list of nearly 50 CIM classes is built in to assist relevant information gathering.
  51. Send to Clipboard.ps1 – Put contents of text or graphics files onto the clipboard – designed for use as a shortcut in explorer’s right click send to menu

General Scripts

  1. Regrecent.ps1 – find registry keys modified in a given time/date window and write the results to a csv file or in an on-screen sortable/filterable grid view. Can include and/or exclude keys by name/regular expression. Blog Post
  2. Leaky.ps1 – simulate a leaky process by causing the PowerShell host process for the script to consume working set memory at a rate and quantity specified on the command line.
  3. Twitter Statistics.ps1 – fetch Twitter statistics, such as the number of followers and tweets, for one or more Twitter handles without using the Twitter API
  4. Sendto Checksummer.ps1 – when a shortcut to this script, by setting the shortcut target to ‘powershell.exe -file “path_to_the_script.ps1”, is added to the user’s Explorer SendTo folder, a right-click option for calculating file checksums/hashes is available. The user will be prompted for which hashing algorithm to use and then the checksums of all selected files will be calculated and shown in a grid view where selected items will be copied to the clipboard when “OK” is clicked.
  5. Zombie Handle Generator.ps1 – opens handles to a given list of processes and then closes them after a given time period or after keyboard input. Used to simulate handle leaks to test other software. Can open process or thread handles.
  6. Sendto folder size.ps1 – shows the sizes of each folder/file selected in explorer, or passed directly on the command line. For each item then selected in the grid view, it will show the largest 50 files. If any files are selected when OK is pressed in that grid view, a prompt to delete will be shown and if Yes is clicked, the files will be deleted via the recycle bin. To install for explorer right-click use and add a shortcut to this script via Powershell.exe -file in the shell:sendto folder.
  7. Compare files in folders.ps1 – compare file attributes and checksums between files in two specified folders, and sub folders. Files selected in the grid view when OK is clicked will then have their differences shown in separate grid views.
  8. Query SQLite database.ps1 – query data from a SQLite database file or show all of the table names. Queries can be qualified with a “where” clause, the columns to return specified, or it defaults to all, and the results output to a csv file or are displayed in an on-screen filterable/sortable grid view.
  9. Find file type.ps1 – Looks at the content of files specified to determine what the type of a file actually is. File types identifiable include various zip formats, image and video formats and executables. It will also seek out files stored in Alternate Data Streams on NTFS volumes.
  10. Set photo dates.ps1  – Get the date/time created from image file metadata and set as the file’s creation date/time which can make it easier to see/sort picture files by the creation date of the image itself, not when the file was copied to the current folder it resides in.
  11. Shortcuts to csv.ps1 – Produce csv reports of the shortcuts in a given folder and sub-folders and optionally email the resulting csv file. Can check shortcuts locally (default) or on a remote server, e.g. for checking centralised Citrix XenApp/XenDesktop shortcuts. By default it will check that the target and working directory exist for a shortcut so the resulting csv file can be filtered on these columns to easily find bad shortcuts.
  12. Update dynamic dns.ps1 – Update dynamic DNS provider if the external IP address has changed (stored in the registry) to update the address or email the details to a given list of recipients.
  13. Find JSON attribute by name.ps1 – Find JSON attributes via name or regex and return the value(s). Saves having to navigate a potentially unknown object structure.
  14. Get chunk at offset.ps1 – display the text from a given file at a given offset within the file. Used with SysInternals Process Monitor (procmon) to see what is being written to a log file for any given procmon trace line.
  15. Digital Clock.ps1 – display a digital clock, stop watch (with 0.1 second granularity) or countdown timer with the ability to “mark” specific points, e.g. when timing a logon clock

Ivanti

  1. AMC configuration exporter.ps1 – Export the configuration of one or more AppSense/Ivanti DesktopNow Management Servers to csv or xml file.
  2. Get process module info.ps1 – Interrogate running processes to extract file and certificate information for their loaded modules which can be useful in composing Ivanti Application Control configurations.
  3. Ivanti UWM EM event processor.ps1 – Get Ivanti UWM EM event log entries and split into sortable table for durations to aid logon analysis. Display on screen in a sortable/filterable grid view or export to a CSV file.

VMware

  1. ESXi cloner.ps1 – Create one or more new VMware ESXi virtual machines from existing VMs nominated as templates. For use when not using vCenter which has a built in templating mechansim. Can created linked clones to save on disk space and drastically speed up new VM creation. Can be used with or without a GUI.
  2. Get VMware or Hyper-V powered on vm details.ps1 – Retrieves details of all powered on virtual machines, or just those matching a name pattern, from either VMware vSphere/ESXi or Hyper-V and either displays them in an on screen sortable & filterable grid view, standard output for further processing or writes to a text file that can be used in a custom field in SysInternals BGinfo tool to show IP addresses of these VMs on your desktop wallpaper which is useful when they are on an isolated network or not registered in DNS.
  3. Power state change running VMs.ps1 – Pause or shutdown running VMs and the ESXi host – designed to be run by UPS shutdown software. Requires the VMware PowerCLI module.
  4. VMware GUI.ps1 – Allow users to view VMs and their details that they have access to in a WPF grid view and perform the following actions if they have permissions in VMware as well as being able to launch mstsc and VMware consoles:
        • Snapshots – take, delete, revert, consolidate
        • Power – on, off, suspend, shutdown/restart guest
        • Reconfigure – number of CPUs, amount of memory and change notes
        • Delete
        • Screenshot
        • Run scripts/cmdlets/exes
        • Mount/Unmount CDs
        • Connect/Disconnect NICs
        • Show events
        • Backup
  1. Set VMware guest info.ps1– Set VM guest information, by connecting to vCenter or ESXi directly, so it can be retrieved in VMs. For example, set the VMware host running the VM in the guest so it knows who its parent is.

Showing Current & Historical User Sessions

One of my pet hates, other than hamsters, is when people logon to infrastructure servers, which provide a service to users either directly or indirectly, to run a console or command when that item is available on another server which isn’t providing user services. For instance, I find people logon to Citrix XenApp Delivery Controllers to run the Studio console where, in my implementations, there will always be a number of management servers where all of the required consoles and PowerShell cmdlets are installed. They compound the issue by then logging on to other infrastructure servers to run additional consoles which is actually more effort for them than just launching the required console instance(s) on the aforementioned management server(s). To make matters even worse, I find they quite often disconnect these sessions rather than logoff and have the temerity to leave consoles running in these disconnected sessions! How not to be in my good books!

Even if I have to troubleshoot an issue on one of these infrastructure servers, I will typically remotely access their event logs, services, etc. via the Computer Management MMC snap-in connected remotely and if I need to run non-GUI commands then I’ll use PowerShell’s Enter-PSSession cmdlet to remote to it which is much less of an impact than getting a full blown interactive session via mstsc or similar.

To find these offenders, I used to run quser .exe, which is what the command “query user” calls, with the /server argument against various servers to check if people were logged on when they shouldn’t have been but I thought that I really ought to script it to make it easier and quicker to run. I then also added the ability to select one or more of these sessions and log them off.

It also pulls in details of the “offending” user’s profile lest that’s too big and needs trimming or deleting. I have written a separate script for user profile analysis and optional deletion which is also available in my GitHub repository.

For instance, running the following command:

 & '.\Show users.ps1' -name '^cxt2[05]\d\d' -current

will result in a grid view similar to the one below:

show users ordered

 

It works by querying Active Directory via the Get-ADComputer cmdlet, runs quser.exe against all machines named CTX20xx and CTX25yy, where xx and yy are numerical, and display them in a grid view. Sessions selected in this grid view when the “OK” button is pressed will be logged off although PowerShell’s built in confirmation mechanism is used so if “OK” is accidentally pressed, the world probably won’t end because of it.

The script can also be used to show historical logons on a range of servers where the range can be specified in one of three ways:

  1. -last x[smhdwy] where x is a number and s=seconds, m=minutes, h=hours, d=days, w=weeks and y=years. For example, ‘-last 7d’ will show sessions logged on in the preceding 7 days
  2. -sinceboot
  3. -start “hh:mm:ss dd/MM/yyyy” -end “hh:mm:ss dd/MM/yyyy” (if the date is omitted then the current date is used)

For example, running the following:

& '.\Show users.ps1' -ou 'contoso.com/Servers/Citrix XenApp/Production/Infrastructure Servers' -last 7d

gives something not totally unlike the output below where the columns can be sorted by clicking on the headings and filters added by clicking “Add criteria”:

show users aged

Note that the OU is specified in this example as a canonical name, so can be copied and pasted out of the properties tab for an OU in AD Users and Computers rather than you having to write it in distinguished name form, although it will accept that format too. It can take a -group option instead of -ou and will recursively enumerate the given group to find all computers and the -name option can be used with both -ou and -group to further restrict what machines are interrogated.

The results are obtained from the User Profile Service operational event log and can be written to file, rather than being displayed in a grid view, by using the -csv option.

Sessions selected when “OK” is pressed will again be logged off although a warning will be produced instead if a session has already been logged off.

If you are looking for a specific user, then this can be specified via the -user option which takes a regular expression as the argument. For instance adding the following to the command line:

-user '(fredbloggs|johndoe)'

will return only sessions for usernames containing “fredbloggs” or “johndoe”

Although I wrote it for querying non-XenApp/RDS servers, as long as the account you use has sufficient privileges, you can point it at these rather than using tools like Citrix Director or Edgesight.

The script is available on GitHub here and use of it is entirely at your own risk although if you run it with the -noprofile option it will not give the OK and Cancel buttons so logoff cannot be initiated from the script. It requires a minimum of version 3.0 of PowerShell, access to the Active Directory PowerShell module and pulls data from servers from 2008R2 upwards.

If you are querying non-English operating systems, there may be an issue since the way the script parses the output from the quser command is to use the column headers, namely ‘USERNAME’,’SESSIONNAME’,’ID’,’STATE’,’IDLE TIME’,’LOGON TIME’ on an English OS, since the output is fixed width. You may need to either edit the script or specify the column names via the -filedNames option.

Profile Cleaner Utility

We EUC consultants can spend a considerable amount of time deciding on and building the most suitable user profile mechanism for our Citrix, VMware and RDS deployments but very little, if any, time is spent doing the same for infrastructure servers. I’m not saying that this is an issue – it isn’t generally – as most people take the out of the box default which is local profiles. However, over time as people leave, we can get disk space issues caused by these stale profiles and even when people haven’t left, their profiles can become large without them realising which can potentially impact the performance of these servers since a machine with a full file system generally doesn’t function well. It can of course also be used on persistent XenApp/RDS servers to check for and delete stale or oversize profiles there.

Having checked this manually for rather too long, I decided to write a script to give visibility of local profiles across a range of machines pulled from Active Directory where the machines to interrogate can be selected by a regular expression matching their name, an organisational unit (e.g. copied to the clipboard from the properties of an OU in the AD Users and Computers MMC snap in) or an AD group.

This actually turned out to be easier than I anticipated, for once, in that I didn’t have to go anywhere near the ProfileList registry key directly since there is a WMI class Win32_UserProfile which contains the required information, albeit with the profile owner as a SID rather than username but in PowerShell it’s easy to get the username for a SID. I’ve pulled out what I think are the most useful fields but if you were to use it, say, for persistent XenApp servers using roaming profiles then you might want to pull more of the fields out.

The script requires the Active Directory PowerShell module to be present wher the script is run from since it will query AD and retrieve various AD properties for the domain users associated with profiles to make it easy to spot users who may have left because their AD account is disabled or their last AD logon was a long time ago.

Thanks to the great PowerShell Out-GridView cmdlet, it was straightforward to take the list of user profiles which were selected when the “OK” button was clicked in the grid view and then delete those profiles, albeit with PowerShell prompting for confirmation before deletions. The deletion is achieved by calling the Delete() method of the win32_userprofile WMI object previously returned for that profile. Obviously the script will need to be run under an account that has the rights to remotely delete profiles.

It’s very simple to use, for example running the script with the following  options will result in a grid view where any profiles that you want to delete can be selected and then the OK button pressed to delete them:

& '.\Profile Cleaner.ps1' -excludeLocal -excludeUsers [^a-z]SVC-[a-z] -name '^CTX\d{4}'

profiles tp delete

This will exclude all local, as in non-domain, accounts and any accounts that start with SVC- as these may be service accounts that are best left well alone, unless the profile size is of a concern. This will be on all servers named CTXxxxx where xxxx is numerical, specified by regular expression, aka regex, which really aren’t that scarey, honest!

An OU, either in canonical or distinguished name format, or AD group can be specified via the -OU and -group options respectively. The -name option can also be specified with either of these to restrict what machines are returned from the OU or group specified.

It will write the profile information to a csv file if the -csv option is specified instead of displaying it in a grid view.

Run with -verbose to get more detail as it runs such as what machine it is querying. It may seem to run slowly but that is most likely to be because it has to traverse each user’s profile in order to determine its size.

The script is available for download from GitHub here and you use it entirely at your own risk.

This is very much an interactive tool – if you need an automated mechanism for removing profiles then I would recommend looking at the delprof2 tool from Helge Klein which is available here.