Outlook Draft Email Reminder

How many times have you either sat there wondering why someone hasn’t responded to an email you’ve sent or someone chases you asking why you haven’t replied to a certain email and in both cases the partial response is actually still in your Outlook drafts folder? Of course, you had every intention of sending that email but you got sidetracked and  then either Outlook got restarted after exiting or crashing, you logged off and back on, shutdown, etc. In both cases, that once open email is then no longer open on your desktop but hidden away in your drafts waiting for you to remember to send it – out of sight, out of mind!

Yes, it has happened to me on more than one occasion so I therefore decided to script a solution to it, or at least something that would politely remind you that you had draft emails that perhaps you might want to finish. I started off writing in VBA but I couldn’t get it to trigger at startup or asynchronously so I switched to PowerShell, which I much prefer anyway.

The script has a number of options but I would suggest that the easiest way to use it is to have it run at logon and give it parameters -waitForOutlook and -wait which  mean that it will wait for an Outlook process to start before it starts checking, although it doesn’t have to since it uses COM to instantiate an Outlook instance of its own anyway, and the -wait means that it will loop around rather than performing one check and exiting.

If it finds draft emails created in the last seven days, although this can be changed via the -withinDays option, a popup will be displayed, which will be on top of all other windows, asking if you want to open them:

outlook drafts

Clicking “Yes” will result in the emails being opened, giving you the opportunity to finally finish and send them. Selecting “No” will either cause the script to exit if the -nowait option isn’t specified or put it to sleep until either a new Outlook instance appears, for instance because you close the current one and at some point start another one, or until the nag timer expires. The nag option, triggered by using the -nag parameter with a value in minutes, will cause the script to remind you, via the popup, that there are drafts that could probably do with your attention.

As I believe the best way to run this is to have it run at logon and then continue to check for draft emails, I added options to install and uninstall it into the registry so that it will be run at logon to save you the hassle of doing this yourself. If you run the following command line, it will create a registry value “Outlook draft nagger” in HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run, or HKLM  if you want it to run for all users and the -allusers option is specified:

& '.\Find Outlook drafts.ps1' -waitForOutlook -withinDays 7 -wait -install "Outlook Drafts Checker" -nag 120

This will nag the user if there are drafts created in the last seven days as soon as Outlook is launched and then nag again either if Outlook is relaunched in that session or every two hours. Alternatively, it could be setup as a scheduled task if preferred but you lose some of its responsiveness such as being able to nag immediately if a new Outlook process for that user is detected.

If you need to remove this autorun, simply run with -uninstall “Outlook draft nagger”.

The script is available on GitHub here and you use it entirely at your own risk although there’s not exactly a great deal of damage that it can wreak. None in fact, other than perhaps you finally finishing and sending an email that perhaps you shouldn’t but don’t blame the script for that, after all you can always delete draft emails rather than send them!