VMware integration added to Citrix PVS device detail viewer & actioner

You may be familiar with the script I wrote, previously covered here and available on GitHub here, that allows you to get a single pane view, either in csv or on-screen in a filterable and sortable grid view, of all your Provisioning Services devices together with information from Delivery controllers, such as machine catalogue and delivery group membership as well as registration and maintenance mode status. When using the grid view, you can select any number of devices to then get a GUI that allows operations like booting or shutting them down and removing from PVS and/or DDC.

When working at a customer recently I came across a number of VMs in VMware that were named using the XenApp worker naming scheme but weren’t being shown in the PVS or Studio consoles. Being the inherently lazy person that I am, I didn’t fancy deleting these individually in VMware and Active Directory, if they even existed in the latter, so I decided that it would be useful to add extra functionality to the script by getting it to add VMs that matched a specific naming pattern, so as not to pull in infrastructure VMs for example, that hadn’t already been pulled from Citrix PVS and DDC data. So I implemented this, utilising VMware  PowerCLI, and then also added a “Remove from Hypervisor” button to the action GUI so that these orphans can be removed in one go, including their hard drives.

To show VMs that don’t exist in either PVS or DDC in the grid view, simply add filters for where the DDC and PVS servers are empty.

show orphaned VMs

It will try to get AD account details too, such as the account creation and last logon dates and the description, in order to try and help you figure out what they are and if they have recently been used. They may not exist in AD, of course though, but that will be apparent in the data displayed, unless you don’t have domain connectivity/rights or the ActiveDirectory PowerShell module available.

This additional functionality is enabled by specifying the -hypervisors argument on the command line and passing it a comma separated list of your vCenter servers. If you do not have cached credentials (e.g. via New-VICredentialStoreItem) or pass through authentication working then it will prompt for credentials for each connection. You must have already installed the VMware PowerCLI package corresponding to the version of vSphere that you are using. There are examples of the command line usage in the help built into the script.

I then realised that in addition to the information already gathered that allows easy identification of devices booting off the wrong vDisk/vDisk version and devices that are overdue a reboot for example, that I could also pull in the following VMware details, again to help identify where VMs are incorrectly configured:

  • Number of CPUs
  • Memory
  • Hard drives (the size of each assigned)
  • NICs (the type of each assigned, e.g. “vmxnet3”)
  • Hypervisor

You can then sort or filter in the grid view or csv to uncover misconfigured VMs.

vmware info

The downside to all this extra information is that there are now up to 42 (a coincidence!) columns of information to be displayed in the grid view but, unfortunately, versions of PowerShell prior to 5.0 can only display a maximum of 30 columns. Csv exports aren’t affected by this limitation though. As I am often heard saying to my kids, it’s better to have something and not need it rather than need something and not have it – you can remove columns in the grid view, by right clicking on any column header, or in Excel, or whatever you use to view the csv. If this will impact you, consider upgrading as there are a whole load more PowerShell features that you’re missing.

To restrict what VMs are returned by the Get-VM cmdlet, you will probably need to use the -name argument together with a regular expression (aka regex) which will only match your XenApp/XenDesktop workers. For instance, if your VMs are called CTX1001 through CTX1234 and also CTX5001 onwards then use something like the following:

'^CTX[15]\d{3}$'

The -name parameter is also used to restrict what PVS devices are included so you can just include a subset if you have, say, a sub-naming convention to name development XenApp servers differently to production ones, e.g. CTXD1234 versus CTXP4567, which will make it quicker.

To check that a regular expression you build matches what you expect before you run the script, there are on-line regex checkers available but I just use PowerShell. For instance, typing the following in a PowerShell session will display “True”:

'CTX1042' -match '^CTX[15]\d{3}$'

I also decided to add a progress indicator since, with hundreds of devices, it can take several minutes to collect all of the relevant data although data is cached where possible to minimise the number of remote calls required. This can be disabled with -noProgress.

If you do have orphaned VMs and you want to remove them, highlight them in the grid view and then click “OK” down in the bottom right hand corner. Ctrl-A can be used to select all items in the grid view. This will then give you the action GUI (ok, not the prettiest user interface ever but it does work!):

pvs device actioner gui vm

where you can power off the VMs if they are on and then delete them from the hypervisor and from AD, all without having to go to any product consoles assuming that you are running the script under an account which has the necessary rights. When you quit this GUI, the devices that you originally selected in the grid view, will be placed into the clipboard in case you need to paste them into a document, etc.

Using -save, -registry and, optionally, -serverset will also save/retrieve  the server(s) specified by -hypervisors to the registry. This means that you don’t have remember server names every time you run the script – handy when you deal with lots of different customers like I do.

Be aware that it needs to be run where the PVS and DDC cmdlets are available so I would recommend installing on a dedicated management server which does not host the PVS or DDC roles so you can also use those consoles, and others you install, on there so that you don’t risk degrading performance of key infrastructure servers. Also, don’t forget VMware PowerCLI and the AD PowerShell module (part of the RSAT feature).

Whilst I have checked the operation of this script as much as one man in West Yorkshire can, if you use it then you do so entirely at your own risk and I cannot be held responsible for any unintentional, or intentional, undesired effects. Always double, and even triple, check before you delete anything!

Having said that, I hope it is as useful for you as it is for me – for a reporting and status tool, I use it daily (weekends included!).

Author: guyrleech

I wrote my first program, in BASIC, in 1980, was a Unix developer after graduation from Manchester University (Computer Science) and then became a consultant, initially with Citrix WinFrame, in 1995 and later into Terminal Server/Services and thence EUC. I currently hold the Citrix CTP, Microsoft MVP, VMware vExpert and Parallels VIPP awards. I invented and wrote the first few versions of the security product which is now Ivanti Application Control (formerly AppSense Application Manager). I now work as an freelance consultant-cum-developer, live in West Yorkshire, England; have a wife, three children, one grandchild and two dogs and was a keen competitive runner until health problems put an end to that fun.

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