Citrix Provisioning Services device detail viewer

Whilst struggling to find some devices in the PVS console that I thought that I’d just added to a customer’s PVS server via the XenDesktop Setup wizard, I reckoned it should be relatively easy to knock up something that would quickly show me all the devices, their device collection, disk properties and then also cross reference to a Citrix Delivery Controller to show machine catalogue, delivery group, registration state and so on. Note that I’m not trying to reinvent that wheel thing here as I know there are already some great PVS documentation scripts such as those from Carl Webster (available here).

What I wanted was something that would let me quickly view and filter the information from multiple PVS servers, such as development and production instances. Whilst PowerShell can easily export to csv and you can then use Excel, or Google Sheets, to sort and filter, that is still a little bit of a faff so I use PowerShell’s great Out-GridView cmdlet which gives you an instant graphical user interface with zero effort (not that using WPF in PowerShell is particularly difficult!) which can be sorted and filtered plus columns you don’t want can be removed without having to modify the script.

The script takes two parameters which it will prompt for if not specified as they are mandatory:

-pvsServers

-ddcs

Both take comma separated lists of PVS servers and Desktop Delivery Controllers respectively although you can just specify a single server for each. If you’ve got multiple PVS servers using the same database then you only need to specify one of them. Ditto for the DDCs.

You can also specify a -csv argument with the name of a csv file if you do want output to got to a csv file but if you don’t then it will default to a filterable and sortable grid view.

Some hopefully useful extra information includes “Booted off latest” where devices with “false” in this column are those which have not been booted off the latest production version of their vDisk so may need rebooting. There’s also “Boot Time” which you can sort on in the grid view to find devices which are overdue a reboot, perhaps because they are not (yet) subject to a scheduled reboot. Plus you can quickly find those that aren’t in machine catalogues or delivery groups or where there is no account for them in Active Directory. You can also filter on devices which are booting off an override version of a vDisk which may be unintentional.

The script is available here and requires version 7.7 or higher of PVS since that is when the PowerShell cmdlets it uses were introduced. Run it from somewhere where you have installed the Citrix PVS and Studio consoles, like a dedicated management server – I’m a firm believer in not running these on their respective servers since that can starve those servers of resourceĀ  and thus adversely affect the environment. Ideally, also have the Active Directory PowerShell module (ActiveDirectory) installed too so that the device’s status in AD can be checked.

I’ve just picked out the fields from PVS, Delivery Controllers and AD that are of interest to me but you should be able to add others in the script if you need to.

 

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Author: guyrleech

I wrote my first (Basic) program in 1980, was a Unix developer after graduation from Manchester University and then became a consultant, initially with Citrix WinFrame, in 1995 and later into Terminal Server/Services and more recently virtualisation, being awarded the VMware vExpert status in 2009 and 2010. I have also had various stints in Technical Pre-Sales, Support and R&D. I work as an independent consultant, scripter and trainer, live in West Yorkshire, England; have a wife, three children and three dogs and am a keen competitive runner when not injured.

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